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Peak Urban : The glocal disconnect in the Anthropocene

Disruptions are not necessarily cataclysmic events located sharply in time. They reach tipping points. In 1956 M. King Hubbert theorised a phenomenon called ‘peak oil’ (1): the moment maximum extraction of crude oil was reached, and from that moment it would go down-hill with the world. ‘Peak oil’ would cast its doom on Planet Earth some time between 1960 and 2050 (with the majority of predictions somewhere next year).

The rise and fall of geo-extraction based internal combustion machines fuelling industrialisation is a (admittedly disruptive) blip on the glacial time scale of geological epochs. It is unsettling, therefore, that we humans are the first species in the existence of the planet to be aware of the fact that we are witnessing a shift in epochs – and are entering into one of our own making.

This is the Anthropocene – where humans have started to make a permanent impact, indelible and observable for the remaining existence of the solar system on the strata of sedimentation of Earth. The Anthropocene is the ultimate disruptor of the Earth’s systems. Geologists have debated where in time the starting point of this human caused sedimentation can be placed. The first detonation of thermo-nuclear devices in the 1940s has been proposed (leaving a thin layer of radioactive matter on the Earth’s crust), others are more ‘conservative’ and observe permanent residue of (micro)plastics in seabeds and mountain ranges as the first evidence of an Anthropocene.

I see human settlement as the phenomenon contributing most to the Anthropocene. After a slow start for about 10000 years urbanisation has picked up pace in the mid-1800s, and Earth has been famously declared an urban planet in an urban century by the United Nations soon after the turn of this millennium (2). More than half of the world’s population now lives in cities, and depending on the method of counting this may yet have reached 70%.

We have reached ‘Peak Urban’ – there is no way back. The urban environment is our future habitat and it is shaping peoples’ health potential and threats. It has suddenly become the permanent disruptor. Romantic notions of natural living surrounded by pristine environments and autarkic subsistence must now be relegated to the Holocene. The environments of our entire lives, whether we like it or not, will be constructed by human structure and human agency. No matter whether they are red (built), grey (institutions), green (natural/terrestrial) or blue (natural/aquatic) environments, our surrounds are anthropocenic and -genic.

It is therefore dramatic that we get these environments so often wrong. Wrong for human interaction and growth, wrong for health and wellbeing, wrong for social and ecological sustainability, wrong at virtually any level. If we create our own urban environment, why don’t we make better efforts at getting it all right?

At its simplest, cities have dual purpose: they concentrate things, and they move things. If one of these functions is not hitting the mark, the other will suffer. Cities thus entering into decay have a hard time emerging into health and prosperity again – let alone into sustainability. Scaled up to global connectivity and ‘peak urban’, some cities do have the value and governance systems to concentrate nimbly, whereas others find themselves isolated and on the fringe of viability – but regressing from city-hood is not an option; they simply decline into urban deserts or withdraw from the equitable provision of services, infrastructure and facilities, turning suburbia into Peak Slum and disconnected and mobility-challenged hotbeds of non-communicable disease, disability and unequal opportunity.

The growth of the local, of urbanity, has not kept pace with the global governance systems that have emerged over the last two centuries or so – those of nation-states declaring sovereignty (3). The Anthropocene created an insurmountable governance disconnect between what matters locally and what happens globally – and the other way around. City-dwellers and their representatives feel increasingly disconnected from the global discourse that drives the creation of health, sustainability and prosperity. They will be the have-nots of the Anthropocene. Millennials are filling this space in glocal connectedness through social media and the gig economy but may not contribute to traditional social and community development, leaving urban administrations that cannot keep pace with these new forms of concentration and mobility yet again left to their own – haphazard – devices. New inequities will emerge between the connected and the disconnected.

Is the glocal disconnect view of Peak Urban in this Anthropocene painting too much of a bleak picture? The future of the urban planet and this urban century surely must look better – especially for the health governance opportunities that are created by concentrations of technology and media?

Yes. There is light. Groups of communities and local governments have explicitly chosen to seek a governance role on the global podium. They have connected around values such as health (Healthy Cities), technology (Smart Cities) and other themes (Resilient Cities, Slow Cities, Age-Friendly Cities, Safe Cities). They have joined, facilitated by Habitat III in Quito, in globe-spanning networks like Sustainable Cities, United Cities and ICLEI, and have explicitly embraced multi-professionalism, the value of connected research and development, the power of committed communities and diversity, and open and transparent exchange of experience. Perhaps one of the most compelling characteristics of these glocal networks (4) is that, different from the second half of the 20th century, there is no distinction between the Global North and the Global South anymore. The urbanist Saskia Sassen (5) a few decades ago described a class of ‘Global Cities’ in which it makes no difference whether you are in Copenhagen, Seoul, Kinshasa, Sao Paolo or Chicago to navigate public transport or the food system – it appears that connected glocal cities of the 21st century, indeed of the Anthropocene, are all world cities.

Networked, distributed glocal urban (health) governance is the only way beyond Peak Urban.

Evelyne de Leeuw
CHETRE

1 Hubbert MK. Nuclear energy and the fossil fuel. In: Drilling and production practice. 1956 Jan 1. American Petroleum Institute.
2 McDonald RI. Global urbanization: can ecologists identify a sustainable way forward? Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 2008 Mar;6(2):99-104.
3 de Leeuw, E., B. Townsend, E. Martin, C. M. Jones & C. Clavier Emerging theoretical frameworks for global health governance. Chapter 6 in: Clavier, C. & E. de Leeuw, eds. 2013 Health Promotion and the Policy Process. Oxford University Press, Oxford
4 Castells M. The new public sphere: Global civil society, communication networks, and global governance. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. 2008 Mar;616(1):78-93.
5 Sassen S. Global city. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press; 1991.

Inequality and Mental Wellbeing Symposium

You are invited to the Inequality and Mental Wellbeing Symposium. It will focus on the impact of inequality on individual and community mental wellbeing and ways we can address this.

Keynote Speakers
Professor Fran Baum, Flinders University

Karen Walsh, CEO Shelter NSW

When
Tuesday 16th October 2018, 8.30am – 4.30pm

Where
Carnes Hill Community Centre – 600 Kurrajong Rd Carnes Hill, NSW 2171

Cost
$45 with scholarships available

For more information
Contact Gabi Martinez on 4621 8714 or email SWSLHD-WellbeingCollaboration@health.nsw.gov.au

To register visit https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/inequality-and-mental-wellbeing-tickets-41373454115

 

Program

 

 

 

 

Preventing Alcohol-Related Harm: What’s Changed?

By Andrew Reid and Joan Silk

 

Second Forum: Friday, March 23, 2018

The Centre for Health Equity Training Research and Evaluation (CHETRE) through Community StaR in partnership with Liverpool Community Drug Action Team (CDAT), recently held our second public forum on Preventing Alcohol-Related Harm. It was almost five years on from our first forum, Alcohol-Related Harm in Our Community, also held in Miller, New South Wales (NSW). We wanted to discuss the changes since 2013 and provide an information update and further insight into preventing alcohol-related harm. Several important changes had happened in the past five years including the introduction of the ‘lockout laws’ in Newcastle and parts of Sydney after several alcohol-fuelled one-punch killings including that of Thomas Kelly in 2014.

Uncle Malcolm Maccol, a local Aboriginal Elder, performed the Welcome to Country, and the Honourable Paul Lynch M.P., NSW state member for Liverpool, officially opened the event at Miller Community Centre. The forum was facilitated by Norman Booker, an experienced health professional and consultant. The sixty people in attendance at the forum shared concerns, questions and comments throughout the event.

 

Not all good news

The good news is that there have been some positive (and hard-fought) changes. Since the ‘lock-out laws’ came into effect, serious injuries from alcohol-fuelled violence have significantly reduced in the Kings Cross and Sydney Central Business District (CBD) Entertainment Precincts. Stricter restrictions on access and availability including on the sale of packaged liquor have been shown to work. However, the NSW Government has not implemented changes in other areas of the state. A highlight of the event was the comprehensive and inspiring Northern Territory plan for addressing alcohol-related harm.

 

More needs to be done

The forum’s three keynote presentations by Emeritus Professor Ian Webster AO, Dr. John Crozier, and Dr. Criss Moore generated knowledge, inspiration, insight and a strong desire to work together closely and effectively to reduce alcohol-related harm in our community. We look forward to a broad implementation of the evidence based measures discussed by our speakers and thank them for generously sharing their expertise and encouragement.

 

Key Issues:

Mental health and Alcohol-Related Harm

Professor Ian Webster‘s keynote presentation discussed the nature of alcohol-related harm and the crucial link between mental health, suicide and alcohol. This highlighted the urgent and growing need for health and related services to address dual mental health and alcohol and other drug (AOD) presentations. For example, in the period 2011–2015, forty percent of male suicides and thirty percent of female suicides were attributable to alcohol use. More national attention on the issue is required, and governments at all levels must work together to prevent such tragedies. The most marginalised and disadvantaged groups are often the most severely impacted. In many parts of Australia, this includes, but is not limited to, the homeless and Indigenous communities. For instance, the overall rate of suicide among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 2015 is more than two times higher than the rest of the population.

 

Marketing and supply of alcohol

As well as detailing the daily economic and horrific health costs of alcohol-related harm, Dr John Crozier’s presentation provided shocking examples of the cynical and sophisticated strategies the alcohol industry uses to widen access and entice customers, including the promotion of online shopping and home delivery. He also covered the blatant tactics alcohol companies use to attract young people. He highlighted the detrimental effects on communities of the increasing availability of alcohol and the ever-expanding range of beverages and alcohol outlets. For every 10,000 litres of alcohol sold through Australian outlets, domestic violence increases by twenty-six percent.

He concluded that private industry profits while the public purse ‘picks up the pieces’.

 

Community Power

Despite the ‘mighty and powerful’ alcohol industry, there have been some significant community victories. Dr. Criss Moore spoke about a group of Casula residents who successfully managed to win a three year battle with a prominent hotelier wishing to establish a late night hotel and gaming venue in their residential suburb. She highlighted the power of community – people power, and gave examples of the organisational methods of a diverse community that stands together to challenge the powerful. Residents held street corner meetings, door knocks, rallies, letters and petitions to raise awareness and action. Tony Brown, chair of the Newcastle CDAT and key activist for the successful Newcastle ‘lockout laws’ and Dr. John Crozier gave much assistance and support to the residents. Dr Moore emphasised the critical importance of building and maintaining relationships with those in the neighbourhood, and beyond.

 

Tackling the availability of alcohol – the ADF toolkit

Damian Dabrowski from the Alcohol and Drug Foundation (ADF), the funding body of this forum, was also present to demonstrate a toolkit that community and others can use to assist in having their voices heard in the decision-making process of regulating the availability of alcohol. See the ADF website at https://adf.org.au/

 

Next steps: Where to from here?

The Q&A panel following the keynote addresses and discussions at the forum suggested that having stronger restrictions on the availability and advertising of packaged liquor is one important way forward in reducing alcohol-related harm. A number of participants also applauded and were inspired by the action of the NT government in addressing alcohol-related harm in a comprehensive, innovative and evidence-based plan. As well as a national response, local action is needed. Local Community Drug Action Teams (CDATs) such as the Liverpool CDAT can help facilitate this and we invite interested community members and service workers to join us.

CHETRE, through Community STaR will continue to work with Liverpool CDAT and others to address critical issues in the AOD space to help improve the health and general well-being of the community.

Hospital Entrances for Well-Being

The Face of the Hospital

Hospitals are under increasing pressure to deliver best innovative healthcare within tight budgetary constraints. While some attention has been given to improving care through the design of emergency departments, operating theatres, and patient rooms, very little attention has been extended to hospital entrances as the ‘healthy face’ of the facility.

 

More than positive perceptions of service

The physical design of the built environment not only can deliver positive results in perceptions of service but also for general human well-being. Well-designed hospital entrances including entry gardens, which are defined as visually pleasing green spaces designed like gardens located near hospital entrances (Yüel, 2013) can improve social capital and reduce stress for patients, visitors and staff. This is indicated by the preliminary findings of our pilot study of the front entrance of Liverpool Hospital, one of the largest hospitals in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. These initial results suggest significant contributing factors include poor signage, lack of seating and shade, amount and closeness to vehicle traffic as well as an inadequate amount of green space.

 

Not new, but a slow resurgence

While the belief that plants and gardens are beneficial for patients in healthcare environments is not new (in some cases more than a thousand years old) and appears prominently both in Asian and Western culture, this notion became less prevalent from the 1900s as hospital administrators and architects looked at traditional architecture, buildings primarily, as the first and foremost line of defence in reducing the risk of infection and serve as functionally efficient settings for new medical technology (Ulrich, 2002). However, in recent years, there has been a resurgence in the idea of having gardens in healthcare settings. This is primarily being driven by the increasing need to create functionally efficient and hygienic environments that also have pleasant, stress-reducing characteristics (Ulrich, 2002).

 

Next Steps

The preliminary findings of the CHETRE literature review and pilot study of the front entrance of Liverpool Hospital, NSW, Australia, show hospital entrances are so much more than mere gateways to health services. Apart from improving perceptions of service, it can contribute to the general well-being of patients, visitors, and staff. Hence, the design of hospitals’ entrances should be considered just as important as other parts of the built environment. However, more research is needed in this area to measure and illustrate this accurately. This is by no means a new concept, but thankfully there has been a slow and steady re-awakening of this idea, in recent years, in the pursuit of building and maintaining functionally efficient and hygienic hospital environments with welcoming and stress-reducing characteristics.

 

 

Ulrich, R. S. (2002). Communicating with the healthcare community about plant benefits. In C. Shoemaker (Ed.) Proceedings of the Sixth International People Plant Symposium. Chicago: Chicago Botanic Garden.

Yüel, G. (2013). Hospital Outdoor Landscape Design. In M. Ozyavuz (Ed.), Advances in Landscape Architecture (pp. 381-398). USA: InTech.

Do we deserve good cities…?

A couple of years ago I went to Buenos Aires to attend the ‘Feria Mundial de Salud y Municipios: Derecho, Ciudadanía y Gestión local integrada para el Desarrollo’ (the World Fair of Local Government and Health: Rights, Citizenship and Integrated Local Management for Development – yes I agree Latinos have a much better way with words than we have). It was a relatively stale talkfest, so one afternoon I skipped class with some Danish community development friends to explore the slums. In Argentina, interestingly, these are called ‘Villas’ – but obviously they don’t even remotely resemble the multi-million dollar abodes you would see in Point Piper.

We ended up passing around and sipping yerba mate with a bunch of heavily tattooed slum dwellers. We chatted about slum life – how it allows communities to live under the radar, but also how that invisibility becomes a problem when you require public services or rights. At one point I suggested that all of those heavies (including their mamas and glorious troupes of kids) lived in the Villa illegally. Oh no, they responded, they were very legal, and (they started pushing my Danish pals and myself up a creaky ladder onto the hot tin roof) this is how we do it: we were looking out over a dusty plain at the edge of the slum. Some of the mate-sipping youths appeared with a couple of slender tree trunks, sheets of corrugated iron and rope. Within minutes they had tied together a shed. They ran back into the Villa and came lugging back two old Pirelli tires, a table and a mattress. The tires went on the roof, the table and mattress under it. “There!” the grandfather next to me on the roof said, “Now we have a legal dwelling.” Apparently something with a roof, a table and a bed cannot be bulldozed.

I had witnessed the most rapid urban sprawl ever.

It’s legal, but is it any good?

I was reminded of this little adventure when I saw the recent debate around population growth and urban planning unfold. Population growth isn’t necessarily bad and can be sustainable – if managed well and with hygienic ideas about purpose and function – spatially, morally, economically and in terms of human development. And urban planning is not just about putting in the hardware, although in the debates on ABC’s Four Corners and Q and A it seemed that the major issues revolved around the kilometers of asphalt, tunnel, and rail.

I have said this before and I will repeat it again. Urban planning, the liveability of our cities, and the sustainability of place is built on that hardware, but they come alive and acquire meaning through the human spirit that is unleashed upon it. In good and bad ways. Let’s take a look at a report of a little while back by Victoria’s Auditor-General on public transport. The singularly most significant message in the report comes from Figure 3B. The caption should have been ‘The shoddy chaos of Melbourne’s transport network’ but of course an esteemed oversight body like the Auditor-General can’t say such things.

What the figure says is that all the hardware is in place. There are trains. There are buses. There are rails. There are roads. But what isn’t there is inspiration, commitment, pride and courage. Buses don’t connect to trains and trains don’t connect to buses. There is no seamless public transport experience. Who wants to wait at a wet draughty bus stop (it is Melbourne, after all) for a vehicle that may or may not come in half an hour? Worse – the same report shows that there is a direct relation between public transport chaos and socio-economic disadvantage: if you are poor, you are made to wait.

If you live towards the edge of suburbia you may be forced to own a car – at great expense. Because we also found that public transport inefficiencies are coupled with lacking bicycle infrastructure.

Let’s be very clear: this is supposedly one of the most liveable cities in the world. Professor Billie Giles-Corti has researched it, so it must be true. And indeed, Australia is home to a virtual raft of eminent urban planning and urban health experts, so surely we get it right, don’t we?

Well we don’t. Just because it’s legal, it ain’t necessarily right. Just like that shack on the outskirts of a Buenos Aires Villa.

What makes cities and urban growth ‘tick’?

There has been a suggestion that the liberal (larrikin?) spirit of the Australian outback has prevented a strong value based politic of urban planning in this country. Indeed, in most welfare state typologies we find this great sunburnt country of ours grouped in with the other total free market friend we have – the United States. State interference is the enemy of individual liberty, everyone should be able to do what they want, and if they want to commute every day for four hours, never see their wives and children during waking hours and suffer disproportionately from obesity, diabetes and other non-communicable disease, so be it, it is a free world.

But we know it is not a free world, and we shouldn’t suffer from shoddiness, corruption, the total absence of human dignity and a general spirit of ‘homo homini lupus’ (‘Man is wolf to man’). We have transcended that, not just in our arts and culture, but in the ideas we have about a good world.

A good world is a green and sustainable world for us and those we love, for the next generation and for our guests (thank you so much, Aboriginal Australians, you are not just the symbolic Traditional Owners and Custodians of this land, you are truly our hosts and we all should take a couple of pages out of your Dreaming). It is a world of solidarity and caring, where needed through our public institutions. It is a world of beauty and surprise that we can navigate easily and with wonder – the infrastructure for population growth and urban planning we need shall be an inspired infrastructure that takes into account long term ecological balance. To do that we need to accept that we are (part of) nature, we are not just here to mine and exploit it. Especially in the fragile ecosystem that Australia is it seems to me that far too few people realise this and act on it. In a citizenship pledge for new Australians we should include a commitment to the sustainability of this ancient and delicate land.

But we do not seem to take pride in our land and our being here. Let me conclude with another very colloquial story. I live in Sydney and I do not own or drive a car here. Every morning I walk through Bigge Park in Liverpool to my office. Liverpool Council has made a tremendous effort to rejuvenate this bit of green space. Only a few weeks back tradesmen (nope, did not spot a woman…) installed new benches. This is what they looked like this morning:

 

On ABC’s Q&A Jane Fitzgerald (Executive Director of the New South Wales Division of the Property Council of Australia) said “we have a choice” – and suggested (or insinuated?) that the same people who deliver such shoddy-to-the-extreme workmanship (or the people who have destroyed it) would care about the world we live in. I’m not sure they would; and I’m not sure our community peers, family elders, intellectuals, politicians, and even infrastructure developers and commercial exploiters are the folk endowed with that ‘choice’, role models we aspire to, if we want to create that world we care for.

In countries where I have lived before I arrived in Australia there is profound concern and ready action for the red (built), grey (infrastructure), blue (water) and green (nature) environment. Often there are long term plans with often a 30 year horizon to invest billions in a comprehensive sustainable future. They are inspired by vision and values. Sometimes these visions are bold and on a grand scale – an entire country’s mobility might be at stake. And often those visions and values can start small: if we are currently developing new residential districts it would only require the tiniest bit of imagination and persuasion to adapt the infrastructure to new, healthy, sustainable and future proof standards. With a fraction of guts every streetlight can become an electric car charger. With the thinnest shred of vision the vast concrete slabs that are our streetscapes are torn out and become permeable surfaces that allow green to thrive and reduce heat islands. With only a sprinkling of values we can care.

If Putin can do it, why can’t public health (but with good intentions)?

Hacking social media to advance health equity

Social media channels have fundamentally changed the ways in which people interact with each other, consume news, and seek out health information. Users can harness these platforms to voice solidarity, raise awareness, and even hijack elections. But can metadata be hacked for good? What can public health learn from influencers? How can something like getting the annual flu shot “go viral”?

Tanja Cappell
Public Health’s Current Use of Social Media

Between extensive geotags, hashtags, and search functionality, social media platforms lend themselves to a variety of public health research and programmatic work. Hashtags and geotags, which allow users to categorize content they post, are searchable. These often publicly-available pieces of metadata have been used by public health professionals for a variety of purposes including surveillancecharacterising neighbourhood features; understanding public sentiment around public health initiatives or campaigns; verifying knowledge of preventive principles; classifying misinformation; and disseminating information in emergencies. Despite the variation in quantity and quality of their use among researchers and practitioners, social media are key in public health work.

 

The Intersection of Social Media, Equity, and Social Determinants of Health

Individuals use social media in a diverse array of ways that have direct and indirect relationships to individual health, population health, equity, and social determinants of health. Not only are people of all ages using social media for health information, they are also sharing their own health-related experiences.

Activism has taken on a new form in the age of social media. Individuals become involved in causes through simply tweeting, or otherwise adding their voice to the conversation digitally. This phenomenon has been termed “slacktivism.” Despite a name that suggests apathy, it should not be discounted, as slacktivism has become an important way in which individuals interact with their networks and the broader social media community. Most recently, millions of women and men around the world shared experiences of sexual harassment and assault using the hashtag #MeToo.

 

There seems to be contradictory evidence related to whether social media can provide a channel through which to engage “hard-to-reach” groups. While some research suggests social media are under-utilised, powerful tools for engaging these groups in conversations and initiatives that could promote health or address social determinants, other literature points out that a digital divide persists, including less access by location, income or age.

 

Future Directions

Social media could be essential tools in advancing health equity. Oppressed, marginalised and low socioeconomic status populations can be reached and more importantly empowered via social media. They allow for direct, real-time connection and interaction. Virtual communities within these networks such as Black Twitter create further opportunities for direct, meaningful engagement. This potential isn’t lost on experts, as international publications call for work that goes beyond behaviourist angle when incorporating social media in health promotion. Social media are imperfect in terms of measurement to be sure, but they might prove (almost) as valuable as survey or data analysis software that are staples of public health research and practice.

The questions of how and the extent to which social media can be effectively used to advance health equity remain unclear. More critically, what might it mean for users and social media if public health is able to successfully exploit algorithms, even in the interest of equity?

 

Melissa Bernstein is a Research Officer at the CHETRE and a Twitter newbie. Follow her: @theMelBern

CHETRE Presentations – Winter/Spring 2017

CHETRE staff have presented work at a number of international conferences in Winter and Spring of 2017. The projects and details about the conferences are listed below.

Projects

 

Western Sydney Airport:

Presenting the findings of a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) conducted through a partnerships between UNSW, South Western Sydney Local Health District, and Western Sydney Community Forum. The HIA was based on stakeholder engagement around the proposed Western Sydney Airport. The HIA produced a set of recommended changes to how ongoing community engagement is conducted in Western Sydney to increase the potential health benefits of the process. These recommendations could be adapted to other large infrastructure projects.

 

 

Wollondilly Shire Council:

The Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation (CHETRE) in partnership with a Local Health District (SWSLHD), and Wollondilly Shire Council (WSC) has worked to identify ways of integrating health into Council policy and planning. The project identified three approaches (1) integrating a health vision in high level policy documents, (2) creating a health assessment policy that identifies at what points and how health can be considered in planning and policy making, and (3) establishing a joint health/ council position.

Conference Presentations

The 14th Annual International Conference on Urban Health (ICUH) this year focused on Health Equity, bringing together researchers, professionals and clinicians from diverse fields . This conference examined urban health from multiple perspectives, and invited participants to engage with the UN sustainable development goals. The week commenced with two days of workshops, and continued with a wide range of presentations including plenary sessions, panel presentations and posters.
Location: Coimbra, Portugal
Dates: 25-29 September 2017

Western Sydney Airport HIA Poster

Suggested citation: Hirono, K., Haigh, F., Jaques, K., de Leeuw, E., Crimeen, A., Fletcher-Lartey, S., Millen, E., Calalang, C., & Harris-Roxas, B. (2017, September) Improving community engagement in aerotropolis development to promote health. Poster presented at the 14th International Conference on Urban Health, Coimbra, Portugal.

Wollondilly Shire Council Poster

Suggested citation: Hirono, K., Haigh, F., Jaques, K., Crimeen, A., Whitten, C., Beer, M., Harris-Roxas, B., & De Leeuw, E. (2017, September). Integrating health into planning: A collaborative approach to creating healthier spaces. Poster presented at the 14th International Conference on Urban Health, Coimbra, Portugal.

 

The Society of Practitioners of Health Impact Assessment (SOPHIA) Workshop provided a unique opportunity for current practitioners of Health Impact Assessment to participate in strategic field building. The workshop was uniquely structured around small working groups, with additional presentations and a keynote panel.
Location: Washington, DC
Date: 2-3 October 2017

Western Sydney Airport HIA Presentation

Suggested citation: Using health impact assessment to increase wellbeing through improved stakeholder engagement in the Western Sydney Airport. Hirono K, Haigh F, Fletcher-Lartey S, Millen E, Calalang C, Jaques K, Harris-Roxas B, De Leeuw E. SOPHIA Practitioners Conference 2017, Washington Dc, 02 Oct 2017 – 03 Oct 2017

Wollondilly Shire Council Presentation

Suggested citation: Integrating health into planning: A collaborative approach to creating healthier spaces. Hirono K, Haigh F, Jaques K, Crimeen A, Whitten C, Beer M, Harris-Roxas B, De Leeuw E. SOPHIA Practitioner Conference 2017, Washington DC, 02 Oct 2017 – 03 Oct 2017


You can read the full Western Sydney Airport HIA report here: Is Anyone Listening? Western Sydney Airport HIA Report
You can read the full Wollondilly Shire Council report here: Wollondilly Health Integration Report