Community STaR event with Joan Silk (10:30-11:30 22 Nov, 2019)

Community STaR presents…

Doing more with less:
Observations about community development in Cuba

Can lessons learned from the Cuban experience
improve health disparities in Australia?

Speaker : Joan Silk

Cuba is the largest island in the Caribbean Sea. Despite limited funding and supplies, Cuba’s adult and youth literacy rate stands at 100%, and it has consistently managed to keep its population of 11 million people healthy into old age with a health system recognized worldwide for its excellence and its efficiency.

Joan Silk visited Cuba in 1997 and again this year. Her presentation will draw on those experiences and reflect on what we can learn from the Cuba experience.

Joan Silk is a health worker with a special interest in the relationship between inequality and health, both on a community and an international level. She has worked in the printing, retail, hospitality and creative industries, as a secondary school teacher, a research assistant, and for the last 20 years as a health equity worker in various communities. She has a BA Honours in Economic History and Politics and a Diploma of Education.

  • When : Friday, November 22, 2019
  • Time : 10:30am – 11:30am
  • Where : Miller Community Centre,
    18A Woodward Crescent, Miller, NSW 2168
  • RSVP by 18 November
  • Register here via Eventbrite
  • For more information, contact: E: Andrew.Reid@health.nsw.gov.au  or T: 02 87389310
  • See flyer

Preventing Alcohol-Related Harm: What’s Changed?

By Andrew Reid and Joan Silk

 

Second Forum: Friday, March 23, 2018

The Centre for Health Equity Training Research and Evaluation (CHETRE) through Community StaR in partnership with Liverpool Community Drug Action Team (CDAT), recently held our second public forum on Preventing Alcohol-Related Harm. It was almost five years on from our first forum, Alcohol-Related Harm in Our Community, also held in Miller, New South Wales (NSW). We wanted to discuss the changes since 2013 and provide an information update and further insight into preventing alcohol-related harm. Several important changes had happened in the past five years including the introduction of the ‘lockout laws’ in Newcastle and parts of Sydney after several alcohol-fuelled one-punch killings including that of Thomas Kelly in 2014.

Uncle Malcolm Maccol, a local Aboriginal Elder, performed the Welcome to Country, and the Honourable Paul Lynch M.P., NSW state member for Liverpool, officially opened the event at Miller Community Centre. The forum was facilitated by Norman Booker, an experienced health professional and consultant. The sixty people in attendance at the forum shared concerns, questions and comments throughout the event.

 

Not all good news

The good news is that there have been some positive (and hard-fought) changes. Since the ‘lock-out laws’ came into effect, serious injuries from alcohol-fuelled violence have significantly reduced in the Kings Cross and Sydney Central Business District (CBD) Entertainment Precincts. Stricter restrictions on access and availability including on the sale of packaged liquor have been shown to work. However, the NSW Government has not implemented changes in other areas of the state. A highlight of the event was the comprehensive and inspiring Northern Territory plan for addressing alcohol-related harm.

 

More needs to be done

The forum’s three keynote presentations by Emeritus Professor Ian Webster AO, Dr. John Crozier, and Dr. Criss Moore generated knowledge, inspiration, insight and a strong desire to work together closely and effectively to reduce alcohol-related harm in our community. We look forward to a broad implementation of the evidence based measures discussed by our speakers and thank them for generously sharing their expertise and encouragement.

 

Key Issues:

Mental health and Alcohol-Related Harm

Professor Ian Webster‘s keynote presentation discussed the nature of alcohol-related harm and the crucial link between mental health, suicide and alcohol. This highlighted the urgent and growing need for health and related services to address dual mental health and alcohol and other drug (AOD) presentations. For example, in the period 2011–2015, forty percent of male suicides and thirty percent of female suicides were attributable to alcohol use. More national attention on the issue is required, and governments at all levels must work together to prevent such tragedies. The most marginalised and disadvantaged groups are often the most severely impacted. In many parts of Australia, this includes, but is not limited to, the homeless and Indigenous communities. For instance, the overall rate of suicide among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 2015 is more than two times higher than the rest of the population.

 

Marketing and supply of alcohol

As well as detailing the daily economic and horrific health costs of alcohol-related harm, Dr John Crozier’s presentation provided shocking examples of the cynical and sophisticated strategies the alcohol industry uses to widen access and entice customers, including the promotion of online shopping and home delivery. He also covered the blatant tactics alcohol companies use to attract young people. He highlighted the detrimental effects on communities of the increasing availability of alcohol and the ever-expanding range of beverages and alcohol outlets. For every 10,000 litres of alcohol sold through Australian outlets, domestic violence increases by twenty-six percent.

He concluded that private industry profits while the public purse ‘picks up the pieces’.

 

Community Power

Despite the ‘mighty and powerful’ alcohol industry, there have been some significant community victories. Dr. Criss Moore spoke about a group of Casula residents who successfully managed to win a three year battle with a prominent hotelier wishing to establish a late night hotel and gaming venue in their residential suburb. She highlighted the power of community – people power, and gave examples of the organisational methods of a diverse community that stands together to challenge the powerful. Residents held street corner meetings, door knocks, rallies, letters and petitions to raise awareness and action. Tony Brown, chair of the Newcastle CDAT and key activist for the successful Newcastle ‘lockout laws’ and Dr. John Crozier gave much assistance and support to the residents. Dr Moore emphasised the critical importance of building and maintaining relationships with those in the neighbourhood, and beyond.

 

Tackling the availability of alcohol – the ADF toolkit

Damian Dabrowski from the Alcohol and Drug Foundation (ADF), the funding body of this forum, was also present to demonstrate a toolkit that community and others can use to assist in having their voices heard in the decision-making process of regulating the availability of alcohol. See the ADF website at https://adf.org.au/

 

Next steps: Where to from here?

The Q&A panel following the keynote addresses and discussions at the forum suggested that having stronger restrictions on the availability and advertising of packaged liquor is one important way forward in reducing alcohol-related harm. A number of participants also applauded and were inspired by the action of the NT government in addressing alcohol-related harm in a comprehensive, innovative and evidence-based plan. As well as a national response, local action is needed. Local Community Drug Action Teams (CDATs) such as the Liverpool CDAT can help facilitate this and we invite interested community members and service workers to join us.

CHETRE, through Community STaR will continue to work with Liverpool CDAT and others to address critical issues in the AOD space to help improve the health and general well-being of the community.